Boston Qualifying

Four ingredients for success

I recently wrote a post on Instagram about my four ingredients for success. I wanted to build on that and add some meat to the bones. When I am asked about how I got faster, there are many reasons why my body has adapted and become stronger {speed work, strength training, nutrition, mental strength}, but when it comes down to it, these four things have had the biggest impact. This can be applied to running but also in all areas of our lives. DREAM BIG.

You must believe in a dream so crazy that it scares you. This goal will light a fire deep within you. It will give you a reason to get out of bed in -20ºC at 5:00 am to train. For me that was Boston back when I was a 4:45+ marathoner. Qualifying for Boston seemed impossible, but there was a tiny voice in my head that asked, Why not you? I started to dream. I stated to plot. I started to think, Yeah! Why not me? I decided then and there I would one day qualify. I wasn't sure how I was going to do it - NEVER worry about the how-to at first - but I knew I was going to do it.

As you move the yardstick closer to achieving your goal, it's important to have stepping stones along the way. These stepping stones can be found daily if you look for them. Your ability to go faster, stronger, longer....

While the dream big goal is the driving force, if you don't have smaller wins along the way, I am afraid you'll miss out on the best part: the journey. As for me, there have certainly been highs and lows in this journey, but you know what? I’ve never once lost my faith that I will achieve this dream.

SHOW UP.

Consistency trumps perfection always. This means showing up when you don’t feel like it. This means doing the work even when it’s not perfect. This means working with what you have RIGHT NOW.

There are many days when we'd rather sleep in, watch Netflix, do anything BUT the thing that will get us closer to our goal. Why does that happen? We are so *fired up* one minute, and other minutes we are ready to throw in the towel and call it a day.

Know that you are NOT the only one who experiences these feelings. When these moments come, tell yourself all you have to do is show up. Somedays these workouts will turn out to be some of the best of your cycle, others will be garbage. That's ok. Your getting out there did more than sitting on the couch. And when that's not enough, there's always tomorrow.

WORK HARD.

"Stop wondering why you didn’t reach the goal you set out to achieve without doing the work required to get there."

Big goals, I don’t care who you are, do not come without hard work and they certainly do not happen over night. This means getting ugly and gritting through each and every tough workout. That 20 miler on the schedule? It’s there for a reason.

After 15 marathons and some time spent in the running community I can tell you that no one is an overnight success. Those people qualifying for Boston in their first marathon? This is not their first rodeo. They've likely been running for years and have equally put in the work. I used to focus on other people's journeys. What are "they" doing that I'm not? STOP. Comparison will get you no where. Put your head down and focus on your own journey.

DON’T QUIT.

Now above all, you can not quit. Trust the process. This journey may be months, it may be years. I won’t deny there aren’t times I wonder what I’m doing. Allow yourself those moments {they’re normal}, but whatever you do, do not quit. Keep moving relentlessly forward. Be open to change and learning from your mistakes.

This is all part of your story.

I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below or find me on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Strava. You can find my latest articles on Salty Running here.

Weekly recap 05.29.17 + Niagara Falls Women's Half Marathon

It’s high time I get back on the training log wagon. Yes, folks, I am training for THE Chicago Marathon. After a difficult race at the 2017 Shamrock Marathon, I’m looking forward to putting in the work this summer to have a PB race come October. Of course I have Boston dreams, but I have promised myself that I will go into Chicago with the goal of enjoying the experience of racing one of the biggest races in the world. To kick training off, I ran the Niagara Falls Women's Half Marathon on Sunday! I wanted to run a race early on in my marathon training to have an indication of where I was and what I will need to accomplish over the summer months. Let the fun begin!

MondayREST.  After one of the most rewarding weekends volunteering at the 2017 Tamarack Ottawa Race Weekend, I needed a couple days rest. I sit on the Run Ottawa Board of Directors and was involved in the organization of the race weekend (six races in total, with over 43,000 participants), along with over 2,500 other volunteers. From loading the trucks on Thursday, to expo and set-up on Friday and Saturday, I went to bed on Sunday evening on less than two hours and sleep and my legs were zapped. Believe it or not, my “step count” for the Sunday was close to 40,000!

TuesdayACTIVE REST. I went to an hour hot yoga class in the evening. Body was feeling better than yesterday. I took the day pretty easy and focused on rolling my calves and feet out in the evening.

Wednesday – 10.1K8 X 400M at half-marathon pace (4:40-4:44/K), 1 minute jog recovery. 3K warm-up, 3K cool-down. Workout went well. Started intervals a bit to fast (I'd rather make this mistake today than on Race Day). Calves still a bit tight, but I still have a few days before the race. Epsom salt bath and rolling out with my Roll Recovery. 

Thursday - 10K easy - Waited to do this run until later in the day. A few extra hours of recovery from the day before always helps! Ran with a friend over to Rideau Hall. Beautiful evening in Ottawa. I wore my CEP compression calf socks all day.

Friday - REST - Flight to Toronto then onto Niagara Falls where the Niagara Women's Half Marathon takes place on Sunday. Focused on hydration while travelling. Listened to lots of podcasts and read some of Dave Asprey's new book Headstrong.

Saturday - 5K Shakeout with 5 x 50m strides - Woke up nice and early and went for a 5K shakeout. Body feeling pretty good. If all goes well tomorrow, I will aim for my sub-1:40. I know I have this time in me. After the run, my parents and I went to the race expo to get my kit and MEET KATHRINE SWITZER. It was pretty special to meet the legendary K.V. in person. We spent the afternoon chilling at home. I got to bed around 9:45 pm.

Sunday - Niagara Falls Women's Half Marathon - 1:43:36 - I woke up, had my coffee and Picky Bar around 6:00 am. We drove to the race and got there an hour in advance, just as it started to rain. I did a 2K warm-up, hit the porta-potty and had my Hammer gel seven minutes before the Start at 8:00 am. I ran the first half of the race according to plan, maintaining a 4:50-ish/K pace. I took my second Hammer gel at 9.5K and had no issues. At around 11K I struggled to pick up the pace. I was aiming to negative split, after all. Unfortunately my legs didn't have a PB in them, but I'm happy with the hard race effort. I managed to place 2nd in my age category (30-34) and 15th overall.

Total: 48.2K

You can follow my daily workouts on Strava!

Anyone else running the 2017 Chicago Marathon? 

I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below or find me on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Strava. You can find my latest articles on Salty Running here.

A letter to #MyFutureSelf

New Balance Canada has launched an initiative that gives runners an opportunity to write a letter to your future self about aspirations in sport and life. You can submit a letter to yourself here. In approximately one year, New Balance will send the letter back to you through a unique time capsule initiative. Make sure to include the hashtags #MyFutureSelf and #iRunMagazine for a chance to have your letter in an upcoming iRun edition! When I saw this initiative, I was intrigued. However, I didn't realize how much of an impact actually writing the letter would have. I highly encourage you to write one.

Here is my letter. 

Jayme,

Look how far you have come. In 2008 you ran your first marathon in 5:38. You were never going to do that again. Running was hard. Training was hard. Why do people do this? You carried on. Remember that feeling when you first broke 2:00 in the half marathon, and then 4:00 in the marathon. I want you to smile when you think about these milestone moments. They always seemed like an impossible hurdle at the time. Yet, you proved you could do it. Now you are training to qualify for Boston. You will get there. Never underestimate the power of a dream.

Look how far you have come. Running at one point in time used to be for a number on a scale. You hated your body and saw running as a way to punish yourself. You were chasing a perfection that could not be defined. Over time, running became more. Running turned into redemption, not punishment. Don’t EVER take the gift of running for granted. Be grateful daily.

Look how far you’ve come. You are in a good place. The demons that used to eat you inside are no longer in control. You still have to work on things (everyone does), but you are strong. Running is still hard, but the daily challenge is something you crave. See this letter as a reminder. A reminder that running has changed your life for the better. You are motivated to run because running makes you strong mentally and physically. You train hard, so that you know come race day You Are Ready. The early morning runs, the hours spent outdoors, never quitting. This is why you run.

#MyFutureSelf #iRunMagazine

-Yourself

Have you wrote a letter to your future self? 

I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below or find me on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Strava.

 

30 minute strength routine

I've kicked 2017 off with a FRESH strength training routine. New workouts always excite me and help to keep things interesting. Over the years, especially as I've started to run more, I've dabbled in a variety of strength training routines. I've done IronStrength, a mishmash of Runner's World, Women's Running, and crossfit workouts, to Kayla Itsines BBG program. You get the picture. I aim to keep my strength training to 30 minutes or less. This allows me to fit it in post-run. I break the week into UPPER BODY and LOWER BODY days, and have also included some YOGA. I also roll my legs out daily with my Roll Recovery. After my achilles injury this summer, I've been taking my strength and recovery routine seriously. I now MAKE TIME for it, rather than doing it when I had extra time. Schedule your priorities. So without further ado, here is my current strength training plan. I've included a link to a demonstration video for each exercise.

Monday, Wednesday, Friday = LOWER BODY

Tuesday, Thursday = CORE + UPPER BODY

Saturday, Sunday (Monday/Friday) = YOGA 

LOWER BODY

Single Leg Deadlift 3 x10 (currently using 10 lbs)

Lunges with Dumbbell 3 x 10 (currently using 10 lbs x 2)

Squat with Dumbbell (currently using 15 lbs)

Single leg Calf Raises with Dumbbell 30 reps to start (currently at 50 reps, 10b dumbbells x 2)

Hamstring Curls with machine 3 x 10 (currently using 50 lbs)

Leg Extension with machine 3 x 10 (currently using 50 lbs)

CORE + UPPER BODY

Classic Plank (currently at 3:00 minutes)

Russian Twist 25 each side (50 reps total)

Scorpion 25 each side (50 reps total)

Spiderman 25 each side

Back Extension on Ball 3 x 12

Jackknife on Ball 3 x 12

Lateral Side Raises* 3 x 12 (currently using 5 lbs x 2)

Shoulder Military Presses* 3 x 12 (currently using 5 lbs x 2)

Bicep Dumbbell Curls 3 x 12 (currently using 10 lbs x 2)

*Start with very low weight. It's really easy to get a shoulder injury if increasing weight + poor form (been there, done that).

YOGA 

I've been going to my local yoga studio once or twice a week. In an effort to be more consistent, I'm giving Jasyoga a try! It's an online yoga-for-runners platform with a ton of selection targetting runners needs. Ideally, I will fit in 2-3 yoga sessions a week. This may be ambitious, but you know I love a challenge.

Leave a comment below if you have any questions! 

Do you have a go-to strength training routine? 

Have you tried online yoga? 

I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below or find me on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Strava. Check out my running story in Canadian Running Magazine

2016.

I sit here writing my 2016 recap with a full heart. 2016 was a special year. For many reasons. Some that I will share and others that do not require recognition on my blog. From running to my personal and business life, we covered a lot of ground this year. I will try to keep this concise {but can't promise anything}. I do. September 24, 2016, will forever be the best day ever. Our wedding took place in Ottawa on a perfect fall day. We had so many family and friends (including many in our bridal party) travel great lengths to celebrate our special day with us. From the morning 5K run with one of my bridesmaids, to getting ready with my crew (who made me feel so beautiful), to the ceremony at our Church, the photos with the talented Amanda Urbanski, the flowers (and much more) from Blue Thistle Florist, to the reception, dinner and dance party with our nearest + dearest family and friends at Mill Street, everything was perfect. This day is a big part of why 2016 was so special. ♡

Trip of a lifetime. We left for our honeymoon the day after our wedding. We flew to Rome from Ottawa and spent four days exploring the city. We then boarded a ship in Civitavecchia, that sailed from southern Italy, to Greece, to Turkey and back. We saw and experienced so much on that trip. Our day in Kuşadası, Turkey was one of my favourite days of the year.

In Ephesus, Turkey

Athens, Greece, with the Acropolis in the background

Two more marathons. I ran my 13th and 14th marathons this year: the Ottawa Marathon (recap) in May; and the Hamilton Marathon (recap) in November. I learned and grew a whole lot while training for these races. Despite an achilles issue in the summer (a huge thank you to my teammate and physiotherapist, Joey, for helping me through that injury), I shaved 13 minutes off my marathon time in 2016 + I'm that much closer to Boston.

The difference between 2015 and 2016 for my running really boils down to one thing: confidence. Thanks to my running coaches (Ken + OAC Racing Team and Lindsey), I have matured as a runner and know what I can expect from myself. I no longer define my training and race plans with what ifs. I look back on the 3,157 kilometres that I ran in 2016 and know that I showed up in running this year. I now run easy runs faster than what my tempo runs used to be. And to think that used to be "impossible"...

As part of joining the OAC Racing Team in the spring, the 2016 Ottawa Marathon's Team Awesome, and connecting through social media with runners from all over the globe (some turned "real life" friends!), I am so grateful for the running community and am reminded daily as to why this sport means so much to me.

With Mom + Dad after qualifying for Chicago at the Hamilton Road2Hope Marathon

More distance covered with friends

Workouts down by the river with the OAC Racing Team

Emilie's Run with the OAC Racing Team

More treadmill kilometres

Coaching business. I am a firm believer that if you have a burning desire to do something, you should do just that. A year or so ago I started thinking about starting my own coaching business. This year I have taken steps to realize that goal, including getting my coaching certification through the North American Academy for Sport Fitness Professionals. I am looking forward to formally launching my business in Spring 2017, and am literally bursting with excitement for the possibilities. You can bet your bottom dollar there will be lots of action on this front in 2017. Stay tuned. In the meantime, I would love to connect with you on Facebook! Like The Pacing Life's page here.

Run Ottawa Board of Directors. As an active member of the Ottawa running community, including my involvement with Run Ottawa in 2015 and 2016, I decided to seek nomination to the Run Ottawa Board of Directors. As of November, I am very pleased to be serving as a two-year Board member and look forward to being a part the continued success and growth of the Run Ottawa events and run club.

Run Ottawa Board of Directors

 

Salty Running. I joined the Salty Running team! Salty Running covers all things running and is focused on female runners who have big dreams. Our readers are people who are serious about their running and I am honoured to work with the talented group of ladies behind the site. As the first Canadian contributor on the site, I naturally chose Maple as my online persona. You can see my introduction here and my first article on Lanni Marchant.

Collect memories, not things. 2016 was also full of many mementos from time spent with friends, including trips to DC and Montreal. As I get older, I am more and more grateful for my people. The lazy mornings, the late nights, the LOLs - I couldn't do life without you.

Fun nights with good friends

In D.C., with two of my favourite people

In Montreal at the Atwater Market in spring

The best sister in the world {and my Maid of Honour}

Wishing you all the best in 2017! ♡

I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below or find me on FacebookTwitterInstagram and Strava. Check out my running story in Canadian Running Magazine

Long Road to Boston

I first learned about Mark Sutcliffe's book back in May when I was on his talk show to speak about the Ottawa Marathon. He mentioned that he was publishing a book on his journey to Boston. Being on my own quest to Hopkinton, I made a mental note that this would be a must read for myself. Fast forward to October, I was invited to attend Mark's hometown book launch of the Long Road to Boston. Hosted at Ottawa City Hall, more than 200 people crowded into the Mayor's Board Room on October 24th to support the book. After being introduced by Mayor Jim Watson, Mark spoke passionately about his quest to Boston and pointed to the various people around the room who were a part of that journey.

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I took the book home that night and began reading. Mark sets the stage by using the first few chapters to give a history of the marathon event and the Boston Marathon. While not all new information for me, I got chills with the reminder of how epic the forty-two-point-two event really is. From the first Olympic games, to K.V.Switzer and the 2013 attacks, there is a reason why the marathon holds so much importance to runners.

Mark tells his story of starting out as an "average" runner, who eventually Boston Qualifies and completes the race from Hopkinton to Boston (spoiler alert). While not always a runner, after getting started, running had became a huge part of his life. I couldn't believe how much of Mark's story I could relate to.

After his first marathon in 2004, Mark went on to complete more than twenty marathons, including the Boston Marathon course with Dean Karnazes. Like many of us, the task of Boston Qualifying seemed unthinkable for many years. I found myself smiling through many pages where Mark reflects on how crazy of an idea Boston Qualifying was, but ultimately found himself obsessed.

Equipped with spreadsheets, training plans, supportive running friends and family, Mark recalls the highs and lows of his journey. While the "journey" is why we run, the outcomes are not always pretty. Mark talks about marathon finishes within seconds of a BQ and the trials that inevitably crop up with marathon training. Regardless if you are chasing the unicorn or not, most can relate to the feeling of being oh-so-close-but-yet-so-far, vividly told by Mark.

The Long Road to Boston is story of why Boston means so much to runners and inspires readers to believe that nothing is impossible. I highly recommend this book for any runner, especially those acquainted in dreaming big and on a quest for self-improvement.

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https://www.instagram.com/p/BMO_VXzh0si/?taken-by=thepacinglife

 

For those of you in Ottawa, Mark will be leading this week's Run Ottawa 6@6 (Wednesday, November 16)! Join myself and fellow Run Ottawa members at Bridgehead Roastery and Coffeehouse at 6:00 pm for a 6K run, followed by a couple of stories from the Long Road to Boston. 

If you cannot make it to the run on time, feel free to join the talk portion around 6:30 pm. More information about the event can be found on Facebook.

Have you read the Long Road to Boston?

I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below or find me on TwitterInstagram and Strava. Check out my running story in Canadian Running Magazine

Road2Hope Marathon 2016 Race Report (Part II)

Read Part I of my Road2Hope Hamilton Marathon recap here. (22-27K) After the half, I knew the famous Road2Hope downhill was just around the corner. I took my second gel and some water. Found my favourite song and knew that there was time to be won on this portion of the race. I momentarily thought about time goals, as I was so afraid of getting excited about a time too early on. Experience is the best teacher I know in the marathon. My head was surprisingly clear. I was on a mission. I will never complain about a downhill, but I will say there is some strategy required. The grade of the road, for example, is incredibly slanted. This meant that with every curve in the road, it was best to run down to the flat shoulder surface of the road. (5:06, 5:00, 5:19, 5:10, 5:16, 5:24)

(28-34K) Coming off the ramp at Barton St. I knew I was two-thirds of the way there and would soon be seeing my parents again along Beach Boulevard. I took my third gel and noticed how many people I was passing, many walking. I briefly thought about how many times I let myself give up and quickly told myself to STOP. We are NOT having that conversation today. Again, I briefly indulged myself in a time goal and decided it would be great if I could go sub-3:45, to give me the Chicago option. I would allow myself to revisit the goal around 34K. For now, keep your head. (5:38, 5:38, 5:26, 5:22, 5:21, 5:16, 5:34)

Now for one of my favourite moments of the race. As I was coming off one of the pedestrian bridges, I wished I had an extra gel. I had four on board, but realized I could use a fifth. Jeeze, Mom even offered to bring an extra one, I thought. Just then, I saw an unopened Espresso Love GU on the ground in front of me. No freakin’ way. God, is that you? I bent down and scooped that gel up so quick, only briefly thinking of the poor soul who dropped it. I held onto it for dear life, while taking my fourth gel early, knowing I now had an extra one.

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(35K) Around 35K the pesky 3:45 bunny snuck back up on me. I knew I had a buffer for the last 8K, to still come sub-3:45, but I would have to hang on. The difference between a decent or noteworthy marathon time is determined in the last 6-8K. I decided then and there that this would be a BREAKTHROUGH marathon for me. I was sooooo sick of knocking 1-2 minutes off, knowing that I had at least 20 minutes to go before my BQ was in reach. Pull it together, Jayme. You can rest later. (5:22)

(36-39K) I hung onto the 3:45 bunny for as long as I could. My legs were trying to quit, as if they had a say, but my mind was yelling louder. NO REGRETS, I chanted. I had built such a thick wall up in my mind that I barely heard the doubt demons knock. I knew they were there and would take advantage of any sign of weakness. Knowing that my average pace needed to stay under 5:20, I kept looking at my watch. My average pace was 5:15 and ticked up to 5:16 then 5:17. Crap. I saw my Mom at 39K. Oh my goodness I was grateful for her words of encouragement. YOU GOT THIS GIRL. (5:29, 5:47, 5:31, 5:45)

(40-42.2K) 2,000 meters and you’re there. I had nothing left in my head. It was a race between me and the clock. As I ran around the bend and up the finisher chute I knew I had given it my all. But was it enough? 3:45:10 on the clock. I was delirious. (5:37, 5:35, 4:57)

After crossing the finish line I saw my Dad and told him there was a strong possibility that I came in under 3:45, but I’ll need to see my chip time. We anxiously waited for the sheets on the wall to be updated. 3:44:55. all. the. feelings. I couldn’t help but cry. This 11 minute PB was breakthrough I needed.

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I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below or find me on TwitterInstagram and Strava. Check out my running story in Canadian Running Magazine

Road2Hope Marathon 2016 Race Report (Part I)

In the lead up to the Road2Hope Hamilton Marathon, I didn’t think much about my time goal. I’ve been there too many times. Overthinking things is not productive, for me at least. Despite my Achilles injury this summer, and the two weeks off-ish during our wedding and honeymoon, I knew that I was more than ready for a breakthrough PB. By how much was the question. To understand where I was mentally, it’s worthwhile telling you where I’ve been at these past few months. I was fed up (and fired up) after finishing the Ottawa Marathon. Finishing in 3:55 did not represent my training. It was hot, I know, but its hard to convince a determined marathoner that the race was “out of my control”. In training for Hamilton, I knew I had a 3:45 in me. Heck, I think there’s a BQ in there too.

I arrived at my parents place in Niagara on Friday evening. I stayed there for the weekend, as Hamilton is close by. Saturday morning I went for a 4K shakeout run, as I normally do. I didn’t realize how much I wanted this race to go well until I started tearing up while I was out there. So many things raced through my mind. The people who have played a role and supported me in getting here, the work I have put in this past year (and the years leading up to this), and how FED UP I was with having another “it wasn’t the race I wanted” marathon. I made a pact with myself that Sunday would be a No Regrets race. Let’s go.

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The rest of Saturday was low-key, filled with lots of carbs, water and Nuun. In previous races I’ve shyed away from *too many* carbs in fear of feeling bloated and gross, and then only to feel empty by 25K. This time I kicked my carbs way up and limited the fat and protein in my diet. Glycogen depletion, I got your number. I was in bed by 8:00pm. My mind had started to race and I knew I would be up early, despite the clocks falling back an hour. I set my alarm for 4:40am and let myself picture a few kilometres of the race before falling asleep. Others count sheep, I guess.

Sunday morning I got up, had my coffee and Picky Bar. I was anxious, but in a good way. It was a perfect day outside, with a low of 4ºC with a high of 11ºC; sunny, with a bit of cloud cover. Frig, I thought. This is the race day I’ve been chasing. We left the house around 6:15am and arrived at the Road2Hope Marathon start around 7:10am. Just enough time for me to wait in line for the port-o-potty (ick) and get to the start. My parents and I had agreed on the spots they’d cheer.

(1-5K) Go-time. Given my last minute jump into the corral (re: toilet), I started the race behind the 3:55 bunny. I didn’t plan to run with a bunny, but would use them as markers along the way. My plan was to race a conservative first half. I managed to pass the 3:55 bunny and caught up with the 3:45 around 5K. (5:11, 5:05, 5:13, 5:10, 5:08)

(6-12K) I settled into my pace and militantly told myself to stay there. I talk to myself a lot on runs and races. I could tell early on that I was in a good place at how calm and confident I was. These paces didn’t scare me. In fact, they felt very easy. More times than I’d like to admit, I allow my mind to get anxious and I start to doubt myself way too early on. This was not going to be that day. I saw my parents around 12K and handed off my gloves.  (5:11, 5:03, 5:20, 5:05, 5:21, 5:11, 5:14)

(13-21K) Around 15K I decided I would not even think about making a move re: pace until after the half. Sit tight and remain calm. Just another day running around the Rideau Canal.  I mentally pictured myself at 16K starting my second loop around the Canal. I know that 30K route like the back of my hand and know I can cover the distance comfortably. And, after all, the real race doesn’t begin until 30K. I crossed the half in 1:50-ish. Keep your head, Jayme. We’re still getting warmed up. (5:15, 5:15, 5:13, 5:16, 5:12, 5:15, 5:12, 5:08, 5:10)

Check back Friday for Part II of my Road2Hope Marathon Race Report!

I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below or find me on TwitterInstagram and Strava. Check out my running story in Canadian Running Magazine

Let's go

img_6691Next Sunday I will run my 14th marathon and my third Hamilton Marathon. I know I can run this distance. That's not the issue, nor has it ever been. What I've been thinking more and more about, is how the race will unfold. As you know, I am on the quest to qualify for Boston. I am also on the quest for the perfect race day. I don't want to get too excited about the forecast, but I will say things are looking promising. Time to see what's possible. Let's go. This week, I will continue my taper and be focusing on mentally getting *there*. I had a couple of not-so-great workouts this past week, but no one said the road to 42.2 would be a smooth ride (if it was, everyone would do it). I've been working hard to squash some pre-race doubt demons. They're always lurking in there. I remind myself of the work I've done. I remember those multiple 36Ks. Keep your head up. Let's go. 

I have three runs planned this week and a few yoga classes in the evening. I will begin carb loading on Thursday and will be trading in my higher fat meals for higher carbs. Sweet potato, rice, bananas, oh my. I fly to Toronto on Friday and will head to the expo that afternoon. Saturday I plan to chill out at my parents and do a shakeout in the morning. We will likely head into Niagara on the Lake for coffee, but other than that, my legs will be up. Keep it simple. Let's go.

It's too early to say what my A,B, and C goals for this race will be. But, I will say that I plan to run the distance faster than I have ever before. I am ready to settle into the uncomfortable, knowing there are no shortcuts to Boston. Hamilton Marathon race week, LET'S GO.

I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below or find me on TwitterInstagram and Strava. Check out my running story in Canadian Running Magazine

 

Time of my life

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Memories for a lifetime 

Hi friends! I realized this weekend it's been one month since my last post and high time I wrote an update. I am reflecting on all the wonderful moments of the past month and can't help but smile.  In my last post, I was preparing for the Army Run half marathon. With a time of 1:48, I was extremely grateful to be running relatively fast, given my recent achilles history.

One week after the Army Run, G and I said "I do." The day was perfect and we are sooo grateful for everyone we shared the day with. It's hard to believe that it's all over now. We had been planning the day since last year and were so pleased with how all the pieces came together.

The next day, we flew to Rome where our honeymoon began. We spent four days exploring the history and food of the city and then boarded a cruise. The boat departed from Civitavecchia, Italy, and stopped at ports in southern Italy, Greece, and Turkey. We had a blast. I ran a bit, but definitely not as much as I would have if I was home. Likely a blessing in disguise, as my achilles was needing the recovery time.

Two weeks until the Hamilton Marathon

img_9529We arrived home on the Sunday night of Thanksgiving. I knew I had some running to do on the Monday. The thing about marathon training, is that it's best not to over think things. I woke up Monday (I had the day off for Thanksgiving), drank my cup of coffee and got the 28K show on the road. That was the beginning of what would be my 101K peak week. The highlight of that week was the 36K, at a decent-for-me pace, I managed six days later.

As I write this post, I have two weeks until the Hamilton Marathon. This will be the third time I've run the race. I've managed to squeak a PR each time I've run. I am realistically hopeful for this race. I've put in the work and know that I am capable of running the race I have played 1,000 times in my head. I have a few more key workouts left, but for the most part, the hard work is done.

The next two weeks will be focused on mentally preparing for the race. I will be selfish. There won't be many late nights, my food will be picky, yoga will be prioritized, and my routine will be followed. I am thankful for the people around me support the crazy marathoner in me. I've also been reading Matt Fitzgerald's, How Bad Do You Want It, and have been thinking a lot about how I've approached marathons in the past. I am preparing to hurt. More than ever before. I'm fired up and know that I'm ready to lay it out there.

"There is no experience quite like that of driving yourself to the point of wanting to give up and then not giving up." 

Did you run a fall marathon? How did it go!?

What running-related books have you read recently? 

I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below or find me on TwitterInstagram and Strava. Check out my running story in Canadian Running Magazine

So long summer 2016

IMG_9604I looked at my calendar this weekend and came to the realization that summer 2016 is coming to a close. How is it September this week? I asked myself. It’s cliché to say, but the summer really did fly by. I look back on the past three months and they seem to blur together, marked with a number of exceptional running and non-running memories. This week also marks less than 30 days until our wedding and just over one year since we got engaged. It’s funny, because I didn’t know what kind of bride I would be. I didn’t grow up planning my wedding, but now that I am here, I can hardly wait. Slowly but surely our to-do list is getting crossed off and we've begun counting down the days.

With regards to running, the training-train chugs on. My Achilles has been touch and go for the past three weeks, but I am pleased to say that overall I've seen progress. I am very grateful for the treatment and advice I have received from medical professionals, my coach and fellow running mates. My mileage has remained constant for the past two weeks and will likely hover around 70K/week for next little bit while I continue to recover.

While I am planning to run the Canada Army Run Half Marathon in three weeks, I am going out there with the goal of enjoying race day. It may end up being a training run with a few kilometres tacked onto the back end. It will also mark one week from my wedding and I can’t picture anything else I’d rather be doing than running the streets of Ottawa and Gatineau in support of our troops.IMG_7555

With ten weeks until the Hamilton Marathon, I am focusing on the DREAM BIG goal here. Real talk, this training session was never about a half marathon PR. Sure it would have been nice to see a sub-1:41 at the Army Run, but I know there will be other days and races for that. My goal this summer was to continue to marathon train, with the hopes of BQ'ing in Hamilton. Yup, just over 20 minutes off my PR. Remembering what they say: IF YOUR DREAMS DON'T SCARE YOU THEY ARE NOT BIG ENOUGH.

Cheers to the end of summer, friends. I hope you had a great one.

I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below or find me on TwitterInstagram and Strava. Check out my running story in Canadian Running Magazine

An update from restville

IMG_5706 As I mentioned, I started experiencing some tenderness in my left achilles last week and have been laying off running for the past few days. In fact, this is the least I've run since zero week post-Ottawa Marathon. I've been OK with this rest for most of the week, however, last night I tried to run 5K and when things weren't the 100% I had hoped they be, I kind of freaked out. OK, I a lot freaked out.

Let me pause and say, I know that this injury is manageable. I've nipped it at the point where I know I can successfully manage the issue back to strength. I had days this week where I barely felt the tenderness I was feeling last week. That said, I now have spidey-sense to the issue and I'm finding myself acutely aware when things flare up.

Back to last night (Thursday). I went for 5K easy along the river. I was hopeful my achilles had improved after nearly a pain-free run on Wednesday and some more Graston application in the morning. The run started OK, with a bit of tenderness that I chalked up to stiffness and the after-effect of the Graston work. Kilometres 2-4 were pain-free-ish. However, I could feel a niggle in the final kilometre. While I've definitely made improvements since last Thursday, I was still a little frustrated.

For this weekend, I've decided to take a few more days off of running. I will stick to the stationary bike and have signed up for my first yoga class in years. I am focusing on the positives of this break. I will have more time to study for my exam on Sunday (!!!) and work on an article I'm writing for Salty Running. In the long run, two weeks off running will not hinder my fall race plans (in fact, it may even make me stronger).

Side note: I'm loving the Olympics coverage!! Tune-in today at 10:10am for the women's 10,000m!! GO NATASHA AND LANNI!

Have you had achilles issues? How long did you take off?

Do you practice yoga? What kind? 

I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below or find me on TwitterInstagram and Strava. Check out my running story in Canadian Running Magazine

Achilles update & the Graston technique

My left Achilles has been acting up a bit. It’s not a full blown injury at this point, but like any seasoned runner, I knew it was headed that way. When I couldn’t complete my track workout last Thursday, I was a bit bummed. Well, actually a lot bummed. Full disclosure, I came home and was nearly in tears to George. I gave myself one night to have a pity party. I’m in the midst of training for the Hamilton Marathon and have been seeing some strong results in my performance. Being smart and taking this week to focus on recovery is the best thing I could do for myself right now. Instead of moping around feeling sorry for myself {which could be an easy route to go}, I’ve focused on maintaining my fitness and training routine by hitting the stationary bike and elliptical daily. Like my running plan, some days are easy (e.g., steady state, moderate resistance) and some days are harder (e.g., hill intervals, longer sessions). I’ve been watching my heart rate and have been pleased that these workouts are allowing me to get some max heart rate work in.IMG_6944

As for my leg, it’s doing much better. I haven’t tried to run on it, but I can tell the total rest has paid off. Last night, I visited a chiropractor recommended to me for application of the Graston technique. It quickly became clear that I've let my legs get way to tight and need to do a better job at stretching post-run and rolling! Today (Tuesday) I will run 3K easy and see how it feels. I'm heading back for some Graston on Thursday and will see how I feel for the weekend. For now, I will be sticking to flat surfaces and keeping to my Hoka One One's.

Do you have a post-run stretching routine?

Have you tried the Graston Technique? 

I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below or find me on TwitterInstagram and Strava. Check out my running story in Canadian Running Magazine

Dream it. Believe it.

On Friday night I had the pleasure of speaking to a Running Room clinic on the topic of goal-setting. I spoke about 5 steps to successful goal setting that have worked in my life. It also gave me a chance to reflect on my own running goals and how I plan to achieve them. Specifically, I have set the goal to qualify for the 2018 Boston Marathon. Boston has been my BIG DREAM since the 2012 Paris Marathon, when I started to realize I could run faster.  Since then, I have taken 50 minutes off my half marathon and about 35 minutes off my marathon time. That said, there's more work to be done. My current marathon PR is 3:55. That means I have about 25 minutes to saw off. I am planning to run the Hamilton Road 2 Hope Marathon in November 2016, the Ottawa Marathon in spring 2017 and likely the Hamilton Road 2 Hope in fall 2017. Wouldn't it be cool if I BQ'd before fall 2017? Sure. But I want to give myself a realistic timeline to achieve this goal.

https://www.instagram.com/p/BHTDa1RDA4g/?taken-by=thepacinglife

 

5 steps to successful goal setting 

1. Have one REALLY big goal.

If your dreams don't scare you, they're not big enough. As someone who ran their first marathon in 5 hours and 40 minutes, Boston was once unthinkable to me. With time and progress, I've realized that anything is possible if you work hard and believe. I've stopped thinking that Boston is some far out dream and know without a doubt that I will run that race. When it's -30ºC and dark outside, I get out of bed because I know how incredible it will feel when I run from Hopkinson to Boston.

2. Be specific.

Some goals need to be more specific than others. For me, this has meant giving myself a timeframe to achieve my long-standing Boston goal. I have given myself a year and a half and will be specific with training and race planning to benchmark progression. As of right now, I am training for a 3:43 in Hamilton this fall. Yes, "43".

3. Write it down.

I will continue to track my progress on my own google spread sheet, Strava and work out journal. I can't stress enough how important it is to have a record of your progress. Not all days will be rainbows, my training logs will remind me of the work I have done and progress I have made. I am also a fan of goal boards and having subtle reminders of what I'm working towards sprinkled around my day to day (e.g., pictures and post-it notes at work, at home).

4. Find someone to keep you accountable.

I am blessed beyond measure and have many supportive people in my life. Specifically, my family and close friends are aware of my goal and I can trust them to hold me accountable. I also use social media as a way to keep myself accountable for workouts and share my progress. I also love to connect with and follow the stories of people chasing their own goals!

5. Have a positive mindset.

As I said above, I've transformed my thinking from "could I qualify?" to "when I qualify." I pay close attention to my thoughts and focus on keeping them positive and productive. I also find it's helpful to have a few mantras and key phrases that help me refocus when I'm in a rut or in a tough workout.

What big goals are you working towards? What's something that helps you stay committed?

Check out my recent posts in Salty Running:

So you want to run a Canadian Marathon, eh?

Lanni Marchant's marathon to the Rio Olympics

Training log for the week of July 4, 2016.

Training log for the week of June 27, 2016.

I’d love to hear from you! Leave a comment below or find me on TwitterInstagram and Strava. Check out my running story in Canadian Running MagazineHave a suggestion for a runner profileLet me know!